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The Hair Salon Remixed

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Your average hair salon has been evolving into specialized beauty bars that cater to clients individual needs. Offering specialized services has proved to be quite lucrative for the smart business owners who have pioneered this trend. Below we'll investigate some of these single-stop beauty shops and learn why only offering one type of service can really pay off.

1. Dry Bar

Dry bar was dreamed up by Ali Webb who began her professional career in public relations before becoming a hair stylist. Ali trained with Toni & Guy before she branched off and started an in-home blowout business. Demand quickly grew for this prestigeos service and when she couldn't keep up with the demand the idea for Drybar was born.

The genius of Drybar, besides the obvious, is that they offer a flat-rate service. No matter how curly, fine or thick your hair is, this non-discriminatory beauty bar offers $35 blowouts no matter how much man power it takes to blow out those locks. Unlike other blowout bars that have a tiered pricing structure, Drybar has become wildly popular (with salons popping up everywhere) because of this genius marketing technique.

2. Bang Station Beverly Hills

Copyright Elaine Reid Photography

The Bang Station in the Beverly Hills salon, The Private Room is the newest addition to these specialized service salons.

As we all know, bangs are BIG - and we also know they can be a huge pain to maintain, with bangs often growing out faster than the rest of the hair cut. Most stylists offer complimentary bang-trims to their clients, but you often have to get them in at a specific time when you'll have a break to accomodate them.

The mind of the consumer can be a funny place and Tina Dozen, the creator of Bang Station, is betting that clients would rather pay a small fee to have the convenience of choosing their appointment times, being able to come in as often as they want, and to not feel like they're bugging their stylist every time they need a bang-trim.

3. The Broot

Broot Salon is the first ever all-natura hair treatment bar. Broot uses fresh ingredients such as avocados, bananas, mayonnaise, eggs and more to create specialized cocktail treatments for the hair. BrootTenders will mix up natural and organic hair treatments that have been passed down through generations.

Broot is banking that clients would rather have this specialized treatment in the salon than deal with doing messy treatments at their home. At Broot you can get pampered and reenergized without having to drop some major dough and your bathroom won't be covered in messy goo.

Word to the wise - I've heard the blowouts after the service are not spectacular but the emphasis at the salon is on the health of the hair and not necessarily the style of it.

4. The Braid Bar at Bergdorfs

The Braid Bar has recently popped up in the penthouse salon, John Barrett, at the iconic Bergdorf Goodman in NYC. Braids are everywhere lately and some of the popular styles can be quite complicated for the everyday client. That's where the agile hands of the Braid Bar experts come in to twist and turn client's locks into masterful works of art.

Some might find it silly to pay someone to braid your hair, but the Braid Bar has proved to be wildly successful.

5. Start Your Own Pop-Up Shop

As a salon owner or manager, don't think you have to run out and invest in a new space if you're looking to expand. You can always expand in your own salon by setting up a specialty pop-up shop. Designate salon assistants to be on-call for bang trims and treatment services, or simply add a la carte menu options to your service list, like a specialty braid.

You could also consider partnering with a manicurist or aesthetician (if your salon doesn't already offer these services) and designate an area in the salon for them to set up for a few months. By advertising these new services (and stressing its limited-time-only status) you'll draw in customers who just might add on a hair service, or pick up a retail product while they're there.

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